Troop 215

Boy Scouts of America

Attendance Policy

 

 No scout will make every meeting and every campout. Family, church, and school activities often conflict with troop activities. High school sports often demand an inordinate amount of time. Yet, attendance is important none the less. As the Boy Scout Handbook puts it, "To gain full advantage of all that Scouting has to offer, you need to be present when things are happening. Take part in meetings, in planning activities, and in the fun of adventures. If you’re there, you can do your part to make your patrol and troop a success." - page 169 All scouts are appreciated whenever they can attend any event. Troop 215 has historically been a very active troop. The strength of the troop depends on the attendance of its members. The troop activities fall into three primary areas of activities: Troop Meetings, Troop Outings, and Troop Service Projects. Being active in this troop means being active in all three of these important areas. It is not sufficient to attend only meetings---scouts that do quickly lose interest in the troop and leave. They also miss the "outing" part of scouting. It is not sufficient to attend only the outings---the meeting are used to teach important skills and allow the older scouts to teach and prepare the younger scouts for these activities. Likewise, the Troop Service Projects are where the second point of the Scout Oath, duty to Others, is put into practice.

The scout rank of Star, Life and Eagle, as well as Eagle Palms require an active participation level for rank advancement. For rank purposes, a minimum attendance of only 50% of the campouts , 50% of meetings and 50% of the service projects will be considered active participation. Scouts who involve themselves in other scout activities outside the troop, such as Order of the Arrow Outings, OA Tapout ceremonies, and ordeal camps, scout summer camp counselor, Philmont High Adventure Treks, den chief activities, cub scout crossover ceremony participation or other scout related activities may count those non-troop activities towards their overall participation level. . Scouts not meeting the 50% activity level in the three areas of activities will not meet a board of review until they fulfill this requirement. Scouts unable to meet the activity level as averaged since their last Board of Review may use the most recent six month period to average their participation level if that works to their benefit. For example, in the previous six months if a scout has attended only 3 outings, 12 troop meetings and made at least one service project event, he would meet the minimum activity level for advancement.. This level of participation is a minimum level, and in fact, if every scout in the troop participated only at the minimum level, the troop would come apart.